Farms and farming

Pictures of farming life a century ago - and today

Photo:Addiewell Mill, beside Cuthill Bridge. c.1910.

Addiewell Mill, beside Cuthill Bridge. c.1910.

john Kelly. All rights reserved. S1. 67.

Photo:Farmworkers bringing in the hay, c. 1920s?  If you recognise the farm, let us know.

Farmworkers bringing in the hay, c. 1920s? If you recognise the farm, let us know.

John Kelly. All rights reserved. S1. 603.

Photo:The caption of this was 'Addiewell Farm', but we think that's wrong.  Let us where you think it is.

The caption of this was 'Addiewell Farm', but we think that's wrong. Let us where you think it is.

John Kelly. All rights reserved. S1. 68

Photo:Clashmedoun - the farmhouse of Bridgend about to be overwhelmed by Addiewell South Bing.  This low, thatched farm included the farmhouse and the steadings in one long row, and would have been typical of small local farms up till the mid-19th century.

Clashmedoun - the farmhouse of Bridgend about to be overwhelmed by Addiewell South Bing. This low, thatched farm included the farmhouse and the steadings in one long row, and would have been typical of small local farms up till the mid-19th century.

West Lothian Local History Library. All rights reserved. S1. 70.

Photo:May Processoin passing Addiewell Farm.  On the right can be seen the gable end of Livingstone Street.

May Processoin passing Addiewell Farm. On the right can be seen the gable end of Livingstone Street.

John Kelly. All rights reserved. S1. 78.

Photo:Same view as the May Procession picture above, but taken in 2009.

Same view as the May Procession picture above, but taken in 2009.

Susan Hillhouse, West Lothian Council.

Photo:Addiewell Farm.  The two-storey part was probably the original farmhouse.

Addiewell Farm. The two-storey part was probably the original farmhouse.

Susan Hillhouse, West Lothian Council.

Some of the farms that once surrounded Addiewell and Loganlea have now been built over - like Addiebrownhill - but others survive.  
Farming methods have changed hugely over the last 100 years.  Where once a farm would have taken five or six or more men to work, many are now worked with just one or two.

Photo:This 1852 shows the many farms in the area before Addiewell village was built.

This 1852 shows the many farms in the area before Addiewell village was built.

Ordnance Survey, 1st edition, 1852.


Addiewell Farm dates from 1762.  On the 1850s map (above), you can see that there used to be a mansion house called Addiewell behind (north of) the present farm.  Probably it was knocked down when Young's Paraffin Light and Mineral Oil Company acquired the estate of Addiewell in the early 1860s. 

This page was added by Sybil Cavanagh on 28/04/2012.
Comments about this page

The first two pics on this page look like the Cuthill farm. First pic is looking from the main road, Addiewell to Bathgate. The second pic is the farmyard behind the farm buildings.

By Dave Toynbee
On 10/02/2014